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Bastiat Ghana slams national tax net widening efforts

June 27, 2015 8:10 PM
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Bastiat Ghana, a liberal economy think tank, says an analytical study has proven that successive governments did not see the achievement of widening the tax net in the short term.

The study, which spans late 2013 to 2015 said government is not happy about the amount generated from tax revenue corresponding to it expenditure targets to address the economic challenges.

A statement issued by Bastiat Ghana by Dr Tweneboah Senzu, Executive Director and copied to Ghana News Agency in Accra, noted that the major concern of Ghana has been the tightening of the tax burden on the already captured businesses on the national database to fulfil its promise to donors in widening the tax net.

This the institute says has mounted pressure on the few in the taxation net, adding: “Sincerely the quality of life of most Ghanaians is depreciating due to inflation.”

The statement said: evidence from our research studies depict that over reliance on classical economic statistics of the trends of the Ghanaian business market could be very deceptive.

“This is due to the rapid changes and development dynamics of the market, such that the identified period to depend on data trends in the economic market is statistically indentified to be in monthly bases precisely and validity could expand not beyond three months.

“Therefore our findings deduce that the force to drive the direction of the economy has to do more with behavioural studies on micro level translating to the macro-economic dynamics, leading to quality initiatives for behavioural orientations.

“ Such is the factors considered, resulting in the designing of the Bastiat Institute module to increase the revenue collection to about 40 per cent greater than the existing revenue collecting database of government just in a duration of 2-3years from 2015.”

The statement said Bastiat Society Ghana sponsored the crafting of the design module as well as its implementation to assist government in widening the tax net to shape the economy better than present.

“Per our principle, we do not only believe in healthy intellectual discourse but pragmatic actions for change. As at now the institute has sponsored the training of it human resources engaged to manage experimental trial in Brong Ahafo, Ashanti Region, Eastern, Greater Accra, Central and Western regions as part of the phase-1 series.

“The coordinators have been trained with the skills of organising and managing small business owners and aspiring to start business to have free entrepreneurship training through our partnered University TUA at the sponsorship of Bastiat Society Ghana. After the training, participants are grouped according to their individual entrepreneurial needs and wants.”

The statement said organised group are assigned to a team of experts as incubators in just a year after their training to nurture them to the position whereby their minds and businesses would be oriented fully into the office of entrepreneurship to qualify quantum of the informal sector to be recognised by government for tax payment.

It would position them in a commitment of payment thereof all in a sponsorship of Bastiat Society Ghana.

“Even though, we as an institute anticipate recalcitrant small business owners who may be reluctant to pay taxes per their own reasons, we believe that per our strategy and model frame work to draw win-win situation- line between Government and the small scale enterprise, taking very important clauses of the constitutions into considerations, we will overcome the situation, if it arises.

“As at now the Bastiat Society Ghana could boast of 1000 membership from the grass root and people may wonder why it is not reflecting in our social media platform? The reason is simple our social media site are for the elite fellowship but the grass root are mostly uneducated.

“If they have education it is to the marginal level and those with the highest level of education are involved so much with the grassroots business that they never have ample time for social media business.

“We have a target of hitting 50,000 memberships in 12 months from July in all spheres of Industrial business sectors, the statement said.

The design module is incorporated with operation sustain your business with capital injection and operations transform your venture into export business.

Source: ghanabusinessnews.com

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Comments - 60
George Christy

July 3, 2015 12:58 AM

"a globalized superelite, of which the well-paid bureaucrats in Brussels are viewed as a prime example." Yes, and how many Americans realize that the EU bureaucracy is answerable to only themselves and that many of them are former Eastern European Communists who are trying to run Europe?"... the emphasis on austerity has wrought huge economic damage and human suffering." !!!HA! Dump fiscal reform, increase the power of the EU bureaucracy to control businesses in Europe and spend, print, spend, print, spend, print until the EU Balloon bursts."Whatever it takes?"HA!

John Treano

July 3, 2015 12:54 AM

The European Union is at a severe disadvantage in its aspirations when considering one of the greatest forces in over the past 100 years - nationalism. Some countries like Greece are not going to accept diktats from outside their own borders even when their problems are of their own making. The Greeks even attempted to lay a guilt trip on Germany which hasn't worked.

local

July 3, 2015 12:54 AM

famines, wars and repression. Now, it's a "freedom," thanks to the EU's Left-Speak vocabulary, which casts all experience in Marxist terms.

jon daly

July 3, 2015 12:54 AM

Beggars can't be choosers. mom taught me that long ago. duh.

Gary Mullennix

July 3, 2015 12:53 AM

If Greece is not punished, heavily, for lying and looting the treasuries of Euro member nations, than the risk of the Cafe scenario where members drop in and drop out, will greatly increase. The monied nations of the EU know this is their last, best chance to create a much closer monetary union. As a long time object lesson to their less successful members, they will let Greece twist slowly in the wind.

Sanjay Saxena

July 3, 2015 12:52 AM

Maybe there should be a Euro Lite currency for the Southern European countries. That would allow them to hold a devalued currency, increase exports, drive down unemployment, and generally improve their economic well-being. They won't become Germany but would be better off than standing in ATM lines.The Greeks are less productive than the Germans. Horses and dogs don't pull a cart together.

Craig Read

July 3, 2015 12:51 AM

WSJ, MSM Keynesians hard at work and lying. Crowning glory? You mean tepid growth, high structural unemployment, no military, the Multiculti, Islam, Globaloneywarming, Wind Mills and Turbines ? Whatever. Bankruptcy is not really a crowning glory, neither is German hegemony via a devalued DM. Greece is a smaller version of France and Spain. They are all bust. Socialism apparently is good at fomenting bankruptcy.

MICHAEL MULLET

July 3, 2015 12:50 AM

Socialism as practiced in Europe is a dead end as the money does indeed run out. Europe today is mostly a bunch of mollified dreamers, both citizens & bureaucracies that deny they need to change their stupefied ways.

Richard Bassett

July 3, 2015 12:50 AM

"The common currency was a logical extension of what went before: the next phase of economic integration." No it wasn't."The pitfalls were widely discussed." No they weren't, they were buried and then ignored.This somewhat sycophantic article may be Mr. Fidler's worst ever. The true EU picture is much more ably captured by George Will who recently noted:"The EU has a flag no one salutes, an anthem no one sings, a president no one can name, a parliament whose powers subtract from those of national legislatures, a bureaucracy no one admires or controls, and rules of fiscal rectitude that no member is penalized for ignoring."

Douglas Oglesby

July 3, 2015 12:49 AM

seems they have done better than the US your last 3 wars you lost and ended up with over $6 trillion in war debts.

Robert Kral

July 3, 2015 12:49 AM

EU= No borders

Mark Hanscomb

July 3, 2015 12:49 AM

"Europe’s Great Project Faces Its Biggest Challenge in Greek Bailout Referendum""Great Project"? Someone please define "Great". A synthetic currency, a detached third layer of government and a single nation can threaten the entire charade?It's a project alright a failed project.

GUSTAVO LUZARDO

July 3, 2015 12:48 AM

Success for the EU means plasticity, malleability, ductility... so to speak, success does not mean "not changing ever", a state needs to get out, let it out, regroup, improve, maybe come back later.I dont understand the alarm.

T Mack

July 3, 2015 12:48 AM

The Euro was doomed from the start.The EU gave Monetary Policy to a Central Authority.The EU gave Fiscal Policy to the Individual Countries.Duh, what could possibly go wrong with this?

Stephan Crain

July 3, 2015 12:48 AM

I find the premise of this piece awfully twisted. I agree that the euro was ill conceived and that the UK got it right by staying with the pound.But to say that the issue breaking apart the euro zone is the "discipline required" to match the highly efficient German economy and that the creditor northern economies are too "resistant to transfers" of monies to the south sounds a little too Krugman to me.I guess the answer is for Germany to devolve into a less competitive, spendthrift nation.The PIGS spent and borrowed like they had a German economy and the northern members have transferred hundreds of billions south.The bill for lunch is just coming due.

Wayne Mayo

July 3, 2015 12:47 AM

"The government says a “no” vote would empower it to drive a tougher bargain for bailout funds with less austerity, while securing the country’s future in the euro."There's no empowering to be had. If you follow this government advice, you will be out of the Euro, bankrupt, and your reputation as a deadbeat country will be in cement.You truly have run your creditors out of patience.

MICHAEL MULLET

July 3, 2015 12:47 AM

2. Thatcher had pointed out years ago that socialism is a good idea till one runs out of other people's money to spend - Greeks have already run out and other southern Europe economies also are running out of German, UK, and French money except for Italy - but whose economy may be imperiled by scores of north Africa immigrants washing up on their shore and proceeding thence throughout the rest of Europe;3. Unless EU gets a grip on the unconstrained immigration the social expenditures spent by each member will most likely outweigh any productivity gains. Who cares if there are "workers" but the real test is productivity. That is why broad definitional changes of GDP are so important to socialists: because their ideas cannot produce out of a wet paper bag except ideas.

Rosolino Italia

July 3, 2015 12:47 AM

Correction: Greece does not have it's own federal reserve. My point remains the same.

David Lewenz

July 3, 2015 12:45 AM

The EU is the bank, Greece is the mortgageewho is about to get foreclosed on. The only difference is Greece gets to keep the money they borrowed and the EU looses the cash and has to take a write down.With 11 Trillion of EU government debt, you can already predict the future of Italy, Spain and Portugal .The writing is on the wall.

Joao Arez

July 3, 2015 12:45 AM

I cannot say it in better words.

Peter Gray

July 3, 2015 12:44 AM

True about the backlash against globalization; the concept is counterintuitive and most of the population does not bother with understanding anything beyond simple, which is not limited to Europe -- just look at Hilary Clinton's popularity among the naive populists.One thing should be pointed out, however, i.e., that US will not allow Greece to exit NATO and will pressure EU to keep Greece in even without the monetary union. Too much is at stake, particularly now when southern Europe is becoming flooded with refugees from ME and North Africa and Putin's Russia becomes more and more unpredictable.

Samir Sharpe

July 3, 2015 12:44 AM

Socialism works just great until the government runs out of money for free cheeseburgers. The Greeks are learning that the hard way.

Agostino Castiglioni

July 3, 2015 12:43 AM

In any case, yes or no at the referendum, Greece will not crash out of Europe, that will pay for a long time the support of Greece. And also countries like Italy, that are in very bad financial situation, will have to contribute heavily. We will have to choose whether cry or laugh.

Tom Blackwell

July 3, 2015 12:43 AM

The crisis of the EU is rooted in the divergent attitudes, focus and ethics of its population. The work ethic in Germany, Belgium, Netherlands and most northern members is very much superior to that of Greece, Italy, Spain and many southern members who lean much more to the left. The politics of the EU are extremely difficult, due largely from varying language, history, culture and self image. But the EU's survival is critical to the stability of Europe in the long term, and not just the economics. Security also is at stake, with an aggressive Bear to the east ready to consume stragglers in a heartbeat.If the Greeks (and Italians, Spanish and Portuguese) had a taste of life in the Russian 'Bloc', they would cling to the EU and what it allows like Linus to his blanket. And the stakes are high for the EU too, as a leak in the dam (with deference to Holland) could lead to a total collapse.

Gerard Pompilio

July 3, 2015 12:43 AM

How ironic that the elitist project to bind Europe, Germany in particular, closer together may be what provokes conflict.

Richard Butler

July 3, 2015 12:42 AM

The drunken collectivist party that is Greece has been broken up by the (German) police and it couldn't happen soon enough.Let this lazy, corrupt kleptocracy deal with its self-inflicted hangover. The citizens who voted for and benefited from these socialist fantasies will now have to pay for their thuggery.

fadel gheit

July 3, 2015 12:42 AM

Greece voted for a young and inexperienced politician who keept the status quo of corruption, graft, living off bailouts and handouts from Europe. Greece is a failed state. It is bankrupt and should be kicked out of the EU. The real tragedy is that Greece, once a global power, has become a welfare begger nation and when pride is gone there is nothing more to lose.

Benson Lee

July 3, 2015 12:42 AM

it is impossible to merge the economic, political, social, and cultural policies of so many nations. they share many similarities but they also share many differences. it is intellectually arrogant to believe the the founding of the Euro can push the countries to behave in identical ways given each country faces different conditions.

Matthew Zobian

July 3, 2015 12:42 AM

Treat Grexit like an old adhesive bandage. Just rip it off, in one quick motion. Short-term pain, but worth it.

Gregory Mather

July 3, 2015 12:41 AM

Seems to be a lot of anti-Germany sentiment out there when it, in my viewpoint, should instead be respectful admiration for a well-run country with fiscal prudence for a long time. While not sexy in the way its spends or behaves, it is stable and not a financial mess. Resenting success is a shame. Germany earned its position in the world through mature and prudent behavior. It has credible, capable, and qualified leaders, not any pretenses. Contrast that with the dynamic duo of the two Greek "leaders" who failed to seriously engage in negotiations for six months. If there were ever a circumstance for leaders to be indicted as well as removed from office for not performing the work of the office to which they were elected, the past six months would be close to qualifying.

Maria Bonanno

July 3, 2015 12:41 AM

Unlike you i am not scared of sharks,scuba dive amongst them all the time --happy?

Gary Frankford

July 3, 2015 12:41 AM

"... whether the fundamental tenet of freedom of movement is sustainable...."This fragment from the article above represents all that is wrong with the EU. "Freedom of movement?" It used to be call "mass migration" caused by local famines, wars and repression. Now, it's a "freedom," thanks to the EU's Left-Speak vocabulary, which casts all experience in Marxist terms.The worrisome mass migrations the world is experiencing today are due to terrible conditions in the migrants' home countries. But flooding them into stable societies will ultimately destabilize the places of refuge.Instead of dealing with violent despots, instead of helping local agrarians feed themselves, instead of dampening local wars via prompt intervention, "freedom of movement" is the new "progressive solution," the "humane thing to do," both in the US and Europe.We are on our way to the next world war.

Steve Makler

July 3, 2015 12:40 AM

It's true that the voters put the Republicans in power and now we stand aghast as we see them doing nothing that they promised. Has the Republican leadership been bribed or blackmailed into their current behavior? I wish I knew. Both parties in Congress seem to act like two sides of the same corrupt coin. It's as though they are in reality just a single elitist club (which you and I are not in) and are distracting us from that fact by pretending to be in opposition. Term limits (and other reforms) are needed to help break up the Club and get Congress composed of people who actually represent their constituents. But only the Club itself has the power to approve that, so it is not likely that this will happen without a huge nonviolent outcry from the citizenry.

Scott Horsburgh

July 3, 2015 12:40 AM

Wrong again. It is more than a stretch to equate Glass Steagall with good economic times. The economy was a disaster after it was enacted (obviously for complicated reasons but Glass Steagall was no cure).

Robert Flatt

July 3, 2015 12:39 AM

Your analogy, not to mention your metaphor, is flawed. If the EU could make it fine without a robust economy (UK), it can certainly make it after jettisoning a failed economy.

Scott Horsburgh

July 3, 2015 12:39 AM

If the choice us between revolution or Marxism on the installment plan, I'll just take my chances rather than give in to those who want to party on my dime.We take good care of the widow and the disabled. The problem is that able-bodied people want the benefits of wealth without the work involved.

CAROL CHEN

July 3, 2015 12:39 AM

There's political de-facto integration considering how Germans are trying to sway Greece's election outcome. Oh how I wish American civil war ended with a split like this. We're still dragging the South kicking and screaming to this day.

subscriber

July 3, 2015 12:39 AM

assuming that all in Europe could enjoy the same standard of living was always quite absurd. reminds one of socialist thinking. Of course the Greeks took advantage. That is what socialists do.

Don Brazier

July 3, 2015 12:39 AM

The US, Canada, Australia and post-War Germany were all able to create federations from pretty well a clean state. The EU members brought centuries of baggage, prejudices, and economies ranging from advanced to medieval. To say nothing of those who cooked the books to get admitted into the Eurozone.The result is a totally unworkable Rube Goldberg structure where national interests always trump the EU's and the European Commission is continually attempting to usurp powers now held at the national level.Reminiscent of the Holy Roman Empire - which was not Holy, Roman nor an Empire.

Barrie Harrop

July 3, 2015 12:38 AM

Get ready for the fire sale anytime soon.

Scott Horsburgh

July 3, 2015 12:38 AM

That's nothing more than socialism with pretty wrapping paper, Mr. Nelson. Corporations exist to profit their shareholders and we have laws and regulations to protect the public good. Only socialism could describe your desire for business to bend down before the public for re-chartering.

Acco Hengst

July 3, 2015 12:38 AM

Eurocrats are not elected and widely resented.National identity is strong and so is the need for national sovereignty. There is a backlash brewing, even in northern Europe. The author correctly identifies the immigrants/refugees as a contributing factor. Ten percent of the Dutch population is now Muslim, higher than France.

PIERRE BIERRE

July 3, 2015 12:37 AM

If the vote is "no" and Greece leaves the Euro, the indolent, lazy, tax-cheating culture will persist, and with it the economic depression. The drachma could really hurt the tourism business if it undergoes rampant inflation, and that would put Greece in a desperate tailspin. Is it possible that a "democracy" would vote itself lax tax enforcement with no external bailout? Will they actually vote to jump off a cliff?

Gregory McQuaide

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

I agree it will regret and it will be the country's biggest & irreversible regret. Its leaders seem pathetically unaware. Amazing.

STEVEN FRANKEL

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

The American people are getting the message, which is why Republicans now control both houses of Congress, a strong majority of governorships and two thirds of all state legislative chambers. Unfortunately, that message hasn't reached the Congressional leadership which is so timid and frightened of its own shadow that it will not impose the kind of fiscal discipline the people are demanding. The Constitutition gives them the authority, the people have given them the power, so when will the Republicans in Congress start to use it and put an end to the madness? The party and the country demand real leadership, and they're not getting it.

Robert Hall

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

The George w legacy.

WAYNE LONGMAN

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

Face it. The EU is a failed project. They hoped to outdo the United States by creating a United Europe out of germanics, latins and slavs. No melting pot, no commonality of language and culture other than distant regulations emanating from Brussels, and more absolutely telling, no common monetary or economic policy. A flawed experiment, let it fail quickly without doing more damage to themselves or the rest of the world.

Gary Frankford

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

Who will fight in the next world war?

James Grundvig

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

Oh really, James? Norway is the winner? How comes?

Domingo Trassens

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

The current situation of European Union is the result of two big sins:1) Greece lied about its financial sickness to be admitted in the euro-zone. The financial and economic problems of the Greeks come from long time ago before the country entered to the euro-zone.2) The authorities of the EU were negligent to block the entrance of Greece into the market. They closed their eyes and they accepted a sick economy inside the community.Now, we see the consequences. In addition, Alexis Tsipras and his partners complicated the situation during the last few months with a ridicule and suicide game.

Henry Lyczak

July 3, 2015 12:36 AM

The risk may not be that Greece (and others?) leave the Euro, rather that Germany and other economically like minded countries get tired of blackmail and form an economic block around a "new mark". Greece is the "poster child" for Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness, without individual responsibility. At this point, that child (through its "leaders") is throwing a tantrum. If the adults in the room give in, expect future tantrums because behavior will not change.

Edvard Govor

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

Do you have an alternative to austerity? What would you do?

JOHN NELSON

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

I always liked that Che shirt, he was a rebel too wasn't he...

JOHN NELSON

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

A bit over-dramatic, wouldn't you say? Marxism and revolution, nah, just simple realignment of power to be back in the hands of the people and not the corporatists. Simple reregulation of banks back to pre-Glass Steagal days, and acknowledgment the government is there to serve the public good not those doling out the campaign funds. Global corporate chartering needs to evolve to include seven year renewal requirements where they're made to demonstrate their social relevance - employment, tax income, innovation, ecological repair & stewardship, in order to receive their limited liability for shareholders. They've become very entitled, when they're here serving at the pleasure of the people.

Karamo Ceesay

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

It comes down to culture and Greeks are a Mediterranean people who take long midday siestas and don't see agreements as necessarily final. This is in direct contrast to Germany's work ethic, with strict adherence to agreements.In short, Greece should never have been admitted to the Euro. The EU will be better off cutting Greece loose. Tsipras is bluffing. He knows full well what Greek's work ethics are and where the Drachma will lead.

Roy Jones

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

I hope you are kidding... You are mixing national currency with national banks: every eurozone country still has its own National Bank...

KENNETH CHEN

July 3, 2015 12:35 AM

The data do not include welfare and social security.

creating a United Europe

July 3, 2015 12:34 AM

Face it. The EU is a failed project. They hoped to outdo the United States by

Kevin Burke

July 3, 2015 12:34 AM

Greece has finally 'hit the wall', they've run out of other peoples money. I can only wonder what it'll be like in the USA, when our government stops borrowing / spending in the same fashion.

Hiram Welker

July 3, 2015 12:33 AM

"The European Union, whose precursor brought the region’s nations together after World War II..."This ghastly article perpetuates the conceit that the EU deserves the credit for postwar European prosperity. A incomparably larger proportion of that credit belongs to the United States of America and NATO, words that do not appear in the article. The fashion in European intellectual circles of ignoring our indispensable role in their peace and prosperity is a disgraceful expression of ingratitude and contempt. One need hardly wonder what nonsense they're teaching their children about us.'If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man.' - Mark Twain